Author Topic: Brabant - Coat of Arms  (Read 1740 times)

(RIP) Harald Magnusson

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Brabant - Coat of Arms
« on: 06 December, 2012, 04:52:31 PM »


(RIP) Robrecht de Béthune

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Re: Brabant - Coat of Arms
« Reply #1 on: 10 December, 2012, 11:26:34 PM »
History:

In Roman times, the settlement area of the Menapii tribes was incorporated into the provinces of Belgica and Germania Inferior. The native Belgic population was of both Celtic and Germanic origin. At the end of the Roman period they were conquered by the Germanic Franks. The region's name is first recorded as the Carolingian shire pagus Bracbatensis, located between the rivers Scheldt and Dijle, from bracha "new" and bant "region".[citation needed] Upon the 843 Treaty of Verdun it was part of Lotharingia within short-lived Middle Francia, and was ceded to East Francia according to the 880 Treaty of Ribemont.

Counts of Leuven

In 959 the East Frankish king Otto I of Germany elevated Count Godfrey of Jülich to a duke of Lower Lorraine. In 962 the duchy became an integral part of the Holy Roman Empire, where Godfrey's successors of the ducal Ardennes-Verdun dynasty also ruled over the Gau of Brabant. Here the Counts of Leuven rose to power, when about 1000 Count Lambert I the Bearded married Gerberga, the daughter of Duke Charles of Lower Lorraine, and acquired the County of Brussels. About 1024 southernmost Brabant fell to Count Reginar V of Mons (Bergen, later Hainaut), and Imperial lands up to the Schelde river in the west came under the rule of the French Counts Baldwin V of Flanders by 1059. Upon the death of Count Palatine Herman II of Lotharingia in 1085, Emperor Henry IV assigned his fief between the Dender and Zenne rivers as the Landgraviate of Brabant to Count Henry III of Leuven and Brussels.

About one hundred years later, the Duchy of Brabant was formally established in 1183/84, and the hereditary title of a Duke of Brabant was created by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa in favour of Henry I of Brabant, son of Count Godfrey III of Leuven. Although the original county was still quite small and limited to the territory between the Dender and Zenne rivers, situated to the west of Brussels, from the 13th century onwards its name was applied to the entire territory under control of the dukes.

In 1190, after the death of Godfrey III, Henry I also became Duke of Lower Lotharingia. By that time the title had lost most of its territorial authority. According to protocol, all his successors were thereafter called Dukes of Brabant and Lower Lotharingia (often called Duke of Lothier).

After the Battle of Worringen in 1288, the dukes of Brabant also acquired the Duchy of Limburg and the lands of Overmaas (trans-Meuse). In 1354 the Joyous Entry, or charter of liberty was granted to the citizens of Brabant by John III.

Burgundian and Habsburg Netherlands

In 1430 the Duchies of Lower Lotharingia, Brabant and Limburg were inherited by Philip the Good of Burgundy and became part of the Burgundian Netherlands.

In 1477 the Duchy of Brabant fell to the House of Habsburg as part of the dowry of Mary of Burgundy. At that time the Duchy extended from Luttre, south of Nivelles to 's Hertogenbosch, with Leuven as the capital city. The subsequent history of Brabant is part of the history of the Habsburg Seventeen Provinces.

Eighty Years War and division of Brabant

The Eighty Years' War (1568–1648) brought the northern parts (essentially the present Dutch province of North Brabant) under military control of the northern insurgents. After the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, the United Provinces' independence was confirmed and northern Brabant was formally ceded to the United Provinces as Staats-Brabant, a federally governed territory.

The southern part remained in Spanish Habsburg hands as a part of the Southern Netherlands. It was transferred to the Austrian branch of the Habsburgs in 1714. During the French occupation of the Southern Netherlands in 1795 the duchy of Brabant was dissolved. The territory was reorganised in the départements of Deux-Nèthes (present province of Antwerp) and Dyle (the later province of Brabant).