Author Topic: The Order of the Serpent  (Read 895 times)

Pero Anes

  • General group
  • Baby Member
  • *
  • Posts: 28
  • Honour: 0
  • Carpe Omnium
The Order of the Serpent
« on: 26 November, 2017, 11:32:46 PM »
The Order of the Serpent



Lay Order of the Guardians of Wisdom. Society of those who write, copy, bound, study or collect books and manuscripts [scrolls](IG).



Established on the 25th November 1317, in Paris, by Pero Anes








Our symbol is the serpent as she is the guardian of the Tree of Wisdom.


We have only one & simple rule of admission: participation.







Grades



Our Order has three grades, from the first lights of knowledge to the bright peak of wisdom:


Emeritus: the master scholar, collector or bookbinder: he or she collects and writes or copies & bounds books, maps, illuminations or engravings and studies them and may also teach from them. She or he may be the Order's administrator and keeps an updated list of all books/scrolls bounded IG.

Magister: the one who has written or copied & bound at least one book, chronicle, map, illumination or engraving or the one who collects them or the one who seeks wisdom by study.

Discipulus: the one that has started his/her path in the Order towards an intellectual, artistic or a supportive/honorific role.



Our Order has also one honorific grade:


Maecenas: the one that welcomes members of the Order on their royal court and rewards them with academic roles and or money for their writing or coping work; or creates a royal library and or a royal university; or creates the office (role) of royal librarian/copyist or royal chronicler or royal binder. S/he may also collect or archive books and official scrolls.




Members



Pero Anes (Emeritus)

Thekla Argyra (Emeritus)

Primula Maria (Emeritus)

Gracia Mendoza (Emeritus)

Vasko Dobrotitsa (Emeritus)

Daenerys Barbossa (Emeritus)

Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes (Emeritus)

Eddard Stark (Magister)

Emma Le Chappelle (Magister)

Freyia Varano (Maecenas)

Lucifel Uchiha (Maecenas)

Anne De Courtney-Anes (Maecenas)

Dusan Nemanjic (Maecenas)

Fabio Spazzoli (Discipulus)






In Memoriam


Theodor I of Bulgaria (Maecenas) RIP

Miro Dulo (Magister) RIP

Pierre Du Vallon (Magister) RIP

Guy Van Vadder (Maecenas) RIP

Berton Berton (Emeritus) RIP

Marin Radosevic (Discipulus) RIP

Alexios Korresios (Discipulus) RIP

Jerman Nemanjic (Emeritus) RIP




Former members


Alain D' Arcy (Discipulus)







Index of all known manuscripts/parchments (IG)




Note this my good reader, some of these works were eaten by Chronos or Fortune. In that case, this is their only mark on Earth.




Sacred Texts


Old Testament (illustrated) copied & bounded by Iohannes de Tata in 1316.

Theogony, by Hesiod; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

The Very Rich Hours of the Duke of Berry; by indeterminate author(s); copied & bounded by Gracia Mendonza in 131?.




Chronicle, Geography and Genealogy


Battles of Fire and Thunder, I, Touraine; (illustrated) written & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Battles of Fire and Thunder, II, London; (illustrated) written & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Battles of Fire and Thunder, III, Hampshire and Salisbury; (illustrated) written & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Battles of Fire and Thunder, IV, Valais; (illustrated) written & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Buildings, Book I, Part I, The Hagia Sophia, by Prokopius of Caesarea; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Chronicle John Palaeologus/Tafur's lineage, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

The Story of the Fourth Crusade, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

Tafur's reception at Court , by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

Santa Sophia & Holy Relics, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

The Statue of Constantine, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

A Holy Pidure, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

The Hippodrome, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

The Legend of the Wall Rider, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

The Palace & the Miserable City, by Pero Tafur; copied & bounded by Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes in 1318.

Chronicle of Scotland 1312, I, by Annan D'Lochlain; (illustrated) written & bounded by Annan D'Lochlain in 1312.

Chronike Diegesis, fragment, by Niketas Choniates; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Chronographia, Book I: Basil II (1 to 22), by Michael Psellos; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Chronographia Bulgarica, Volume I; (illustrated) collated, edited and bounded by Duarte Vaz de Lisboa in 1316.

Chronographia Bulgarica, Volume II, The Epiro & Albanian Campaign; (illustrated) written and bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Despotate Odrin; written & bounded by Daenerys Barbossa in 1315.

Geography, Book 3, Chapter 1, by Strabo; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Historia Calamitatum or Pierre Abelard's Biography, Foreword and chapters I to X; copied & bounded by Iohannes De Tata in 1316.

Itinerari' per Arago'; (illustrated) written & bounded by Iohannes De Tata in 1316.

Il Vichingo delle Fiandre, by Berton Berton; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Family Dobrotitsa, I & II; written & bounded by Vasko Dobrotitsa in 1315.

Lives, Solon, by Plutarch; copied & bounded by Duarte Vaz de Lisboa in 1316.

On the capture of Thessalonica in 904, Chapters 23 to 35, by John Kaminiates; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Panegirico di Giovanni di Baldino Suardo by Berton Berton; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

Serbian Civil War of 1314 A.D., written & bounded by Jerman Nemanjic in 1317.

Synopsis of Histories, by John Skylitzes; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

The Alexiad, Book I, by Anna Komnene; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

The Gallic Wars, by Julius Caesar; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

The Histories, Book I, Clio, by Herodotus; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

The Life of Lucullus, by Plinius; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.




Arts & Crafts


A Collection of Arabic Poetry; (illustrated) collected and bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Against Ctesiphon, by Aeschines; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

A Tale from 1001 Nights; (illustrated) collected and bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

De Re Coquinaria, by Apicius; collected and bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

For Ctesiphon, by Demosthenes; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Le Viandier de Taillevent, by Guillaume Tirel; collected and bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

Llibre Vermeill de Montserrat, score/music in latin; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Iohannes De Tata in 1316.

Medea, one scene, by Euripides; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On Agriculture, by Marcus Cato; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

On the defence of fortified positions, Book 1, by Aeneas; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On Weapons and War, by Pero Anes; in two parts, illustrated; copied & bounded by Pero Anes in 1318.

Strategikos, Proemium, The Choice of a General, The Characteristics of a good General, The General's advisory Council, by Onasander;  (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Tactics, I and II, by Asclepiodotus; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

The Aberdeen Bestiary, by indeterminate author(s); copied & bounded by Gracia Mendonza in 131?.

The Book of Beasts, 5 volumes, by Pero Anes; (illustrated) written & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317-1318.

The Ring of the Dove, by Ibn Hazam; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Pero Anes in 1317.

The Iliad, Book I, by Homer; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

The Odyssey, Book I, by Homer; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.





Philosophy


Apology of Socrates, Socrates' Defense, by Plato; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Discourses, by Dio Chrysostom; by copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

Metaphysics, Book I, Part 1 to 3, by Aristotle; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On Duties, Book I, Cicero; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On the Ends of Good and Bad Things, by Cicero; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Six Enneads, First Tractate, The animate and the man, by Plotin; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.





Cartography


Civitates Orbis Terrarum, I to III; copied & bounded by Gracia Mendonza in 131?.

Islas Baleares, antiguo reino de Mallorca; copied & bounded by Gracia Mendonza in 131?.



Medicine


Aphorisms, Section I, 1 to 25, by  Hippocrates; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in February 1316.

Canon of Medicine, by Avicenna; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

De Methodo Medico, Book I and Book V, by Galen; copied & bounded by Iohannes de Tata in 1316.

Medical Compendium, Preface, by Paul of Aegina; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Method of Medicine, Book I, 1, by Galen; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Oath, by Hippocrates; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On Medical Material, Book I, Aromatics, by Pedanios Dioskurides; (richly illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

On the Natural Faculties, Book I, 1 to 10, by  Galen; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Prognostics, Part I to XXV, by Hippocrates; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.




Other Sciences


Almagest, Book I (Preface to 7), by Ptolemy; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Elements, by Euclid; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Geometrical solutions derived from Mechanics, by Archimedes; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Naturalis Historia, by Pliny; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 131?.

Synopsis of Rhetoric, by Michael Psellos; (illustrated) copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.

Tetrabiblos, Book I, Introduction, That knowledge by astronomical means is attainable, and how far, That it is also Beneficial, by Ptolemy; copied & bounded by Thekla Argyra in 1316.




Engravings & Paintings


Views of cities (Kingdoms of Spain and Aragon), copied & bounded by Gracia Mendonza in 131?.

The Tarot deck, bounded by Nekro Phoro in 13??.



(updating)




Official Book-markets [scrolls](IG).



Those who collect written or illustrated parchments (scrolls) can read and buy them in these cities:


Paris/Ile-de-France (market and library)
Konstantinoupolis (major book-market and library)



Finis
« Last Edit: 14 July, 2019, 09:07:41 PM by Pero Anes »
Pero Anes e Courtney

Vassal of Vexin
Marquis de Vexin and Lord of Yorkshire
Scholar, Emeritus & founder of the Order of the Serpent
Founder of the Ane's Library    
Founding member of the The Merchant's Guild    
Trader, parchment collector & moneylender

Thekla Argyra

  • General group
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 478
  • Honour: 2
Re: The Order of the Serpent
« Reply #1 on: 10 April, 2018, 08:15:43 PM »
Manual on how to format text in paper scrolls


1 - available bb codes[/u]

You can look up bbcodes using your prefered search engine. One example of such a compilation is https://www.phpbb.com/community/help/bbcode

However, I am not sure if all codes can be used when writing paper scrolls and unfortunateluy there is no preview option available in this context.
As a work around, you can use the preview function in the forum.

I did open a thread at the sugestion board to add this option.

But please note that the various codes can be combined.

Commonly used by myself:
Code: [Select]
[center][/center] to fix a text or image in the centre of the line.
Code: [Select]
[b][/b],[u][/u] to make text bold or underlined
Code: [Select]
[img][/img] to add an image by inserting its url



2 - principles in layout design[/u]

Well, I don't have too much to say about that. There is a lot of information available in the internet, go look it up if you want to create something pleasing to the eye.
Here is a related wikipedia article to start with: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canons_of_page_construction
There are some basic rules how to create harmony and beauty, most well known is probably the so-called golden ratio.

However, the Middle ages are a time where books were not done with too much concern for or the necessary knowledge on how to make eye candy, which leaves all that to your choice.

Two simple things concerning layout:
You may want to hamonize the size and colours of images you want to use in one scroll, so they seem more in tune with each other and thus harmonic.
Keep in mind the common screen resolutions of your readers and avoid making them scroll too much to the sides when reading. At some point images will even be wider than the scroll limits and overlap the frame.



3 - misc. tipps and hints[/u]

You can not edit sealed scrolls. If you want to make changes, you will need to make a new scroll.

Use the forum (or any other place that works with bb code) to preview your text and check for typos, code errors, misalignments, image size, etc.

Do not forget to delete your character's Signature while you seal scrolls. Otherwise it will automatically be added to the bottom of your scroll.

You can use
Code: [Select]
[code][./code](without the .) to deactivate bb code within this tagged area for others to see. In itself that is not useful in scrolls, but if you want to share the original source text for others to make a copy with themselves as authors, it is an easy way to share your work. See example to understand what I mean.



4 - example[/u]

First the original source text:

Code: [Select]
[center][u]The Song of Maisuna[/u]

The russet suit of camel's hair,
With spirits light, and eye serene,
Is dearer to my bosom far
Than all the trappings of a queen.

The humble tent and murmuring breeze
That whistles thro' its fluttering wall,
My unaspiring fancy please
Better than towers and splendid halls.

Th' attendant colts that bounding fly
And frolic by the litter's side,
Are dearer in Maisuna's eye
Than gorgeous mules in all their pride.

The watch-dog's voice that bays whene'er
A stranger seeks his master's cot,
Sounds sweeter in Maisuna's ear
Than yonder trumpet's long-drawn note.

The rustic youth unspoilt by art,
Son of my kindred, poor but free,
Will ever to Maisuna's heart
Be dearer, pamper'd fool, than thee.

---Maisuna, Wife to the Caliph Mowiah

[img]http://www2.pic-upload.de/img/29052711/fauna2.jpg[/img]
 

[u]To My Father[/u]

Must then my failings from the shaft
Of anger ne'er escape?
And dost thou storm because I've quaff'd
The water of the grape?

That I can thus from wine be driv'n
Thou surely ne'er canst think---
Another reason thou hast giv'n
Why I resolve to drink.

'Twas sweet the flowing cup to seize,
'Tis sweet thy rage to see;
And first I drink myself to please;
And next---to anger thee.

---The Caliph Yazid

   
[u]On Fatalism[/u]

Not always wealth, not always force
A splendid destiny commands;
The lordly vulture gnaws the corpse
That rots upon yon barren sands.

Nor want, nor weakness still conspires
To bind us to a sordid state;
The fly that with a touch expires
Sips honey from the royal plate.

---The Holy Imam Shafay

[u]Lines to Haroun and Yahia[/u]

Th' affrighted sun ere while he fled,
And hid his radiant face in night;
A cheerless gloom the world o'erspread---
But Haroun came and all was bright.

Again the sun shoots forth his rays,
Nature is decked in beauty's robe---
For mighty Haroun's scepter sways,
And Yahia's arm sustains the globe.

---Isaac Al Mouseli
 

[u]To My Favorite Mistress[/u]

I saw their jealous eyeballs roll,
I saw them mark each glance of mine,
I saw thy terrors, and my soul
Shared ev'ry pang that tortured thine.

In vain to wean my constant heart,
Or quench my glowing flame, they strove;
Each deep-laid scheme, each envious art,
But waked my fears for her I love.

'Twas this compelled the stern decree,
That forced thee to those distant towers,
And left me naught but love for thee,
To cheer my solitary hours.

Yet let not Abla sink deprest,
Nor separation's pangs deplore;
We meet not---'tis to meet more blest;
We parted---'tis to part no more.

---Saif Addaulet, Sultan of Aleppo   

[u]To a Lady Weeping[/u]

When I beheld thy blue eyes shine
Through the bright drop that pity drew,
I saw beneath those tears of thine
A blue-ey'd violet bathed in dew.

The violet ever scents the gale,
Its hues adorn the fairest wreath,
But sweetest through a dewy veil
Its colors glow, its odors breathe.

And thus thy charms in brightness rise---
When wit and pleasure round thee play,
When mirth sits smiling in thine eyes,
Who but admires their sprightly ray?
But when through pity's flood they gleam,
Who but must love their softened beam?

---Ibn Al Rumi


[u]On A Valetudinarian[/u]

So careful is Isa, and anxious to last,
So afraid of himself is he grown,
He swears through two nostrils the breath goes too fast,
And he's trying to breathe through but one.

  --Ibn Al Rumi


[u]On A Miser[/u]

"Hang her, a thoughtless, wasteful fool,
She scatters corn where'er she goes"---
Quoth Hassan, angry at his mule,
That dropped a dinner to the crows.

---Ibn Al Rumi

[img]http://www2.pic-upload.de/img/29052714/fauna3.jpg[/img]

[u]To A Cat[/u]

Poor puss is gone! 'Tis fate's decree---
Yet I must still her loss deplore,
For dearer than a child was she,
And ne'er shall I behold her more.

With many a sad presaging tear
This morn I saw her steal away,
While she went on without a fear
Except that she should miss her prey.

I saw her to the dove-house climb,
With cautious feet and slow she stept
Resolved to balance loss of time
By eating faster than she crept.

Her subtle foes were on the watch,
And marked her course, with fury fraught,
And while she hoped the birds to catch,
An arrow's point the huntress caught.

In fancy she had got them all,
And drunk their blood and sucked their breath;
Alas! she only got a fall,
And only drank the draught of death.

Why, why was pigeons' flesh so nice,
That thoughtless cats should love it thus?
Hadst thou but lived on rats and mice,
Thou hadst been living still, poor puss.

Curst be the taste, howe'er refined,
That prompts us for such joys to wish,
And curst the dainty where we find
Destruction lurking in the dish.

---Ibn Alalaf Alnaharwany

[img]http://www2.pic-upload.de/img/29052713/floral.jpg[/img]
[/center]


copy and binding commissioned by the Roman Empress Thekla Argyra, revered patron of the arts.


followed by the finished sealed scroll:


The Song of Maisuna

The russet suit of camel's hair,
With spirits light, and eye serene,
Is dearer to my bosom far
Than all the trappings of a queen.

The humble tent and murmuring breeze
That whistles thro' its fluttering wall,
My unaspiring fancy please
Better than towers and splendid halls.

Th' attendant colts that bounding fly
And frolic by the litter's side,
Are dearer in Maisuna's eye
Than gorgeous mules in all their pride.

The watch-dog's voice that bays whene'er
A stranger seeks his master's cot,
Sounds sweeter in Maisuna's ear
Than yonder trumpet's long-drawn note.

The rustic youth unspoilt by art,
Son of my kindred, poor but free,
Will ever to Maisuna's heart
Be dearer, pamper'd fool, than thee.

---Maisuna, Wife to the Caliph Mowiah


 

To My Father

Must then my failings from the shaft
Of anger ne'er escape?
And dost thou storm because I've quaff'd
The water of the grape?

That I can thus from wine be driv'n
Thou surely ne'er canst think---
Another reason thou hast giv'n
Why I resolve to drink.

'Twas sweet the flowing cup to seize,
'Tis sweet thy rage to see;
And first I drink myself to please;
And next---to anger thee.

---The Caliph Yazid

   
On Fatalism

Not always wealth, not always force
A splendid destiny commands;
The lordly vulture gnaws the corpse
That rots upon yon barren sands.

Nor want, nor weakness still conspires
To bind us to a sordid state;
The fly that with a touch expires
Sips honey from the royal plate.

---The Holy Imam Shafay

Lines to Haroun and Yahia

Th' affrighted sun ere while he fled,
And hid his radiant face in night;
A cheerless gloom the world o'erspread---
But Haroun came and all was bright.

Again the sun shoots forth his rays,
Nature is decked in beauty's robe---
For mighty Haroun's scepter sways,
And Yahia's arm sustains the globe.

---Isaac Al Mouseli
 

To My Favorite Mistress

I saw their jealous eyeballs roll,
I saw them mark each glance of mine,
I saw thy terrors, and my soul
Shared ev'ry pang that tortured thine.

In vain to wean my constant heart,
Or quench my glowing flame, they strove;
Each deep-laid scheme, each envious art,
But waked my fears for her I love.

'Twas this compelled the stern decree,
That forced thee to those distant towers,
And left me naught but love for thee,
To cheer my solitary hours.

Yet let not Abla sink deprest,
Nor separation's pangs deplore;
We meet not---'tis to meet more blest;
We parted---'tis to part no more.

---Saif Addaulet, Sultan of Aleppo   

To a Lady Weeping

When I beheld thy blue eyes shine
Through the bright drop that pity drew,
I saw beneath those tears of thine
A blue-ey'd violet bathed in dew.

The violet ever scents the gale,
Its hues adorn the fairest wreath,
But sweetest through a dewy veil
Its colors glow, its odors breathe.

And thus thy charms in brightness rise---
When wit and pleasure round thee play,
When mirth sits smiling in thine eyes,
Who but admires their sprightly ray?
But when through pity's flood they gleam,
Who but must love their softened beam?

---Ibn Al Rumi


On A Valetudinarian

So careful is Isa, and anxious to last,
So afraid of himself is he grown,
He swears through two nostrils the breath goes too fast,
And he's trying to breathe through but one.

  --Ibn Al Rumi


On A Miser

"Hang her, a thoughtless, wasteful fool,
She scatters corn where'er she goes"---
Quoth Hassan, angry at his mule,
That dropped a dinner to the crows.

---Ibn Al Rumi



To A Cat

Poor puss is gone! 'Tis fate's decree---
Yet I must still her loss deplore,
For dearer than a child was she,
And ne'er shall I behold her more.

With many a sad presaging tear
This morn I saw her steal away,
While she went on without a fear
Except that she should miss her prey.

I saw her to the dove-house climb,
With cautious feet and slow she stept
Resolved to balance loss of time
By eating faster than she crept.

Her subtle foes were on the watch,
And marked her course, with fury fraught,
And while she hoped the birds to catch,
An arrow's point the huntress caught.

In fancy she had got them all,
And drunk their blood and sucked their breath;
Alas! she only got a fall,
And only drank the draught of death.

Why, why was pigeons' flesh so nice,
That thoughtless cats should love it thus?
Hadst thou but lived on rats and mice,
Thou hadst been living still, poor puss.

Curst be the taste, howe'er refined,
That prompts us for such joys to wish,
And curst the dainty where we find
Destruction lurking in the dish.

---Ibn Alalaf Alnaharwany




copy and binding commissioned by the Roman Empress Thekla Argyra, revered patron of the arts.
« Last Edit: 10 April, 2018, 08:18:31 PM by Thekla Argyra »
Byzantium - glory, commitment, burden
"It was the eternal scene of mankind - the minions of violence, the victim and forever the third, the spectator, who does not raise his hands, does not defend the victim, does not try to free him, because he fears for his own savety and whose own savety is therefore threatened forever." Remarque
Please help finding wiki errors here

Anne De Courtney

  • General group
  • Baby Member
  • *
  • Posts: 28
  • Honour: 0
  • Lady Anne De Courtney-Anes, Vassal of York
Re: The Order of the Serpent
« Reply #2 on: 02 July, 2019, 09:33:39 PM »
Sadly some of the pictures in the above scroll seem to have faded. I wonder is there a better way to preserve the images?