Author Topic: The Market in Bergenshus;  (Read 511 times)

(RIP) Anderson Buck

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The Market in Bergenshus;
« on: 26 May, 2017, 09:43:49 AM »
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The Market in Bergen was chartered by Aviendha Althor in March of 1316 and hosts semi-annual fairs.  Very colorful, the market is constructed of 160 stalls varying in size, mostly of stone and wood, but a few which could only be considered small tents all crowded about the southernmost point of the peninsula which Bergen is founded upon, and directly south of the castle gate.  All roads lead to the ski slopes in the hinters and hills which are shrouded all year long in damp mists and huge storms that cast shadows hundreds of kilometers long.

There are a few notable smaller districts, like the Fish Market which actually sells hops and flowers all year long but no fish, and the Lamb market where they only sell hot fresh-forged tools, weapons, and armor bearing the Bergen tang stamp.  Mostly the market is frequented by iron and coal miners selling their wares for money to spend at the local Innkeepers residence and Tavern.  Food left at the market often goes amiss and visitors are forewarned.

Rats have become a serious issue.  They tunnel inside the stone walls and nest.  At night, those who live near the market and above swear; when the moon is "new" (and just a shadow) an inteligent race of rats gather here in the wane light.  They plot serious felonies and it's no small wonder that prisoners from the nearby jail who have escaped and become lost in the catacombs below the city are found mummified by sudden mudslides having crates of wine, wedges of aged cheese, and caches of shiny coin scattered about their bones.

If one doesn't know the market well it's discouraged to wander as gangs of rats are known to overpower a person and steal their food even the trousers of some foreign traders.  Occasionally they're blamed for a merchant's vessel losing it's mooring and drifting out to water so be careful when coming to shore.